A Kansas Country Garden: The Month of September


Autumn Joy Sedum line the front sidewalk.
Autumn Joy Sedum does bring joy. It's autumn floral display is the peak of its many  good attributes, but  from the moment the little round balls peek from the ground in early spring, through the heat of the summer and on into winter when its dried flower stalks add interest in the garden, it's always a great plant. Right now its the bees, butterflies and insects who may be singing its praises the loudest. They love this plant, too. Maybe more than I do.


I have placed Autumn Joy Sedum in many places throughout the garden,
There is a lot to love about fall. The cooler weather revives some of the plants. Others begin their bloom. As the leaves begin to change color, it's a poignant reminder of the temporary nature of the garden. Cherish these days of color and warmth. They will not last forever.


No longer on my "wish list", this bench was an anniversary gift.
Sweet Autumn Clematis is worth waiting for with its lovely scent and bloom.
Twining on the bridge, Morning Glories have a vibrant purple bloom.


As it ages, the bloom of the rose colored gomphrena elongates,  
I have had volunteer Sweet Autumn Clematis plants come up and have placed them around the garden.
A lone rose blooms on this bush.
I have enjoyed this lantana this summer. I just learned that my mother-in-law overwinters her lantana inside. Should I bring this in? Maybe I'll take a few slips.
This Angel Wing begonia reminds me of my grandmother who had a similar plant.
I believe this is a Dragon Wing begonia which is always blooming. It will be coming inside soon.
This mum is in no hurry to bloom. Better get busy--it's getting colder!

1 comment:

  1. Thanks for sharing your beautiful garden! I especially love the morning glories!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for visiting my blog. Please feel free to leave a comment.